http://www.isorg.fr/ http://www.isorg.fr/ Sat, 18 Nov 2017 09:34:59 GMT <![CDATA[See the first worldwide plastic image sensor Mona Lisa demo]]>
See the first worldwide plastic image sensor Mona Lisa demo See on Youtube the first image scanning by a plastic image sensor :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLWuh0uwSh0 

ISORG and Plastic Logic have co-developed the first conformable organic image sensor on plastic, with the potential to revolutionise weight/power trade-offs and optical design parameters for any systems with a digital imaging element.
First presentation will be publicly unveiled at Printed Electronics USA 2013 in Santa Clara on november 20th-21th 2013.

The collaboration is based on the deposition of organic printed photodetectors (OPD), pioneered by ISORG, onto a plastic organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane, developed by the technology leader, Plastic Logic, to create a flexible sensor with a 4x4 cm active area, 375um pitch (175um pixel size with 200um spacing) and 94 x 95 = 8 930 pixel resolution.
The backplane design, production process and materials were optimised for the application by Plastic Logic to meet ISORG's requirements. The result, a flexible, transmissive backplane, represents a significant breakthrough in the manufacture of new large area image sensors and demonstrates the potential use of Plastic Logic's unique flexible transistor technology to also move beyond plastic displays. Combined with ISORG's unique organic photodetector technology, it opens up the possibilities for a range of new applications, based around digital image sensing, including smart packaging and sensors for medical equipment and biomedical diagnostics, security and mobile commerce (user identification by fingerprint scanning), environmental, industrial, scanning surfaces and 3D interactive user interfaces for consumer electronics (printers, smartphones, tablets, etc.).

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Wed, 13 Nov 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-289
<![CDATA[ISORG Magic Twist and Magic Slider, the post tactile technologies]]>
ISORG Magic Twist and Magic Slider, the post tactile technologies ISORG has developed innovative user interfaces / man-machine interfaces
based on optical sensors in printed and organic electronics, the Magic Twist 
and Magic Slider.
Thanks tolarge area photodetectors positioned below the surface, glass and plastic
surfaces are transformed into smart surfaces able of hand proximity
detection and gesture recognition.
These surfaces can be used as tactile surfaces with highly robust usages
(operating with grease and water at the surface, operation with gloves)
in particular for home appliances products and industrial applications.
They can be used also without any contact with the surface operating
at a few centimeters above the surface (by detection of infra-red light
reflected by the hand). This touchless operation enables creation of
highly innovative and high value products for home appliances
(such as induction cooktop).

Videos on line on Youtube :

Magic Twist :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEplkxpFT8A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaFZYa8OrsI

Magic Slider :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDzsRDx34U4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WZ2uCrStXg







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Tue, 24 Sep 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-288
<![CDATA[Flexible image sensors move nearer to market]]>
Flexible image sensors move nearer to market A new prototype demonstrate the potential of conformable plastic-based image sensors.

Flexible image sensor
A recently unveiled proof-of-concept device indicate the strides being made towards flexible plastic-based image sensors, and the potential advantages they may have over their inorganic counterparts.

The device developed by Plastic Logic of the UK and France's ISORG, was on show at the LOPE-C 2013 printed electronics conference held in Germany in June 2013.

On the threshold

The Anglo-French sensor is said to be the first conformable organic image sensor of its type, potentially allowing more favorable power-to-weight trade-offs and novel optical design parameters for any systems with a digital imaging element.

"This is the first time an organic thin-cell transistor backplane has been combined with a organic photodiode layer which is printed over the plastic substrate," confirmed Ian Reid of Plastic Logic to Optics.org. "Plastic Logic manufactured the plastic organic thin-film transistor backplane, which was then combined with ISORG's organic photodetector (OPD) technology. Some integration work was involved, but both processes are fundamentally mature and established by the respective companies."

The result was a flexible sensor with a 4 x 4 cm active area; a pitch of 375 microns, with 175 microns pixel size and 200 microns spacing; and a 94 x 95 pixel grid.

"This is a proof-of-concept demonstrator and was designed as such, so we did not push the manufacturing process or the sensor performance to its absolute limit," noted Reid. "The pixel resolution, which is determined by the backplane, equates to 60 pixels per inch (ppi); not spectacular, but chosen to simplify the testing and characterization task at this stage."

Although the developers have set no target resolution for any final product, the high-resolution processing developed by Plastic Logic for the manufacture of backplanes in electrophoretic displays has comfortably achieved densities of 150 to 225 ppi, so steps towards that figure seem readily foreseeable.

Both the backplane and the OPD layer are manufactured using printing operations at ambient temperature, potentially leading to substantial cost-efficiencies compared to the manufacturing processes involved in traditional inorganic components. A printing operation could also enable distributed sensor arrays over larger areas than can be achieved by silicon-based processes, avoiding the limits imposed by wafer size and fabrication technology.

The flexible nature of the sensors should bring its own advantages, lending itself to non-planar sensor arrays following curved or distorted paths, and opening up an extra design dimension for engineers. A further advantage could be the greater spectral range commonly shown by OPD components, and Reid envisages imaging systems able to employ the same component type for near-IR and visible sensing.

"We have known for some time that our flexible plastic technology is usable not just in backplanes for driving displays, but for other types of applications too," he said. "Having industrialized a process successfully for driving electrophoretic displays, it's natural to look at where we can take the technology. We are on the threshold of something very exciting in the flexible electronics area, and the design community is starting to think about what they can do with it."


www.optics.org
Tim Hayes is a contributing editor at Optics.org


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Thu, 18 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-286
<![CDATA[Printed electronics opens up large flexible sensor design opportunities]]>
Printed electronics opens up large flexible sensor design opportunities Compared to traditional electronic solutions, printed electronics offers several differentiating factors which make them particularly well suited to sensing application. Most printing processes are compatible with large area substrates, which enable the design of large area sensors with sensing capabilities across surfaces of up to 500x500mm. This at a very competitive cost per area ratio (compared to amorphous silicon or CMOS technologies).

A pioneer in printed electronics applied to optical sensors, ISORG addresses several markets and functionalities. This includes scanning surfaces for X-ray
digital imaging with the co-integration of organic photodiodes with transistors on amorphous silicon, photodiodes combined with organic transistors on
plastic substrate.

In the future, substituting amorphous silicon technology with organic electronics will increase cost competitiveness and enable new products developments
(for lighter and more robust portable equipment). The first demonstrator of such a full organic image sensor is being fabricated as a collaborative development between Isorg and Plastic Logic. More particularly, the collaboration focuses on the deposition of organic printed photodetectors onto a plastic organic thin-film transistor backplane, to create a flexible sensor with a 40x40mm active area, 375um pitch (175um pixel size with 200um spacing) and a 94x95 = 8 930 pixel resolution.

Biometrics applications using fingerprint and palmar surface recognition could use printed electronics to substitute the typical CMOS-based sensors with thinner and lighter organic solutions. Current developments yield a pixel resolution of 50um. Such approaches could also enable the design of large scanning surfaces to substitute CCD line scanners in office equipment, yielding faster, lighter and thinner document scanners. 

Printed electronics also finds its way in temperature sensors in printed electronics, applying its large area sensing capabilities to the detection of hot spots, for example to monitor the power distribution and heat dissipation in power electronics
circuit boards.

Thin and flexible: a system-on-foil approach

Using PET as a substrate, it is now possible to design systemon-foil sensing solutions that combine optical sensors, discrete components such LED and flexible interconnections. In this way, contactless user interfaces can be built using organic
photodetectors, offering functionalities such as hand proximity detection and gesture recognition for power on/off or linear control (slider and vertical distance detection). These conformable system-on-foil user interfaces can even be integrated in smart
textiles products. The optical solution relies on the detection by organic photodetectors of the reflected infra-red light emitted by IR-LEDs directly mounted on a flex circuit, as shown in Figure 3. For this purpose, the organic semiconductor materials can
be tuned to operate both in visible and near infra-red bands. Being very thin and easy to glue to other substrates such as paper, these new sensors can easily turn plastic and paper into interactive surfaces for merchandising and smart packaging solutions or to detect nearby motion. Another use case for such optical sensors is to integrate NIR emitting LEDs and organic photodiodes at the periphery of a surface so that any object left on the surface can be spotted through the detection of light path occlusion - see Figure 4. Such applications are under development for industrial products and multi-touch user interfaces and displays.


Retrofit sensors

Because flexible and printed electronics foil sensors are easy to glue, they can easily be fitted to existing equipment. For example, Isorg is investigating the use of optical sensors for spatial spectroscopy as an in-line process control for the pharmaceutical
industry. These sensors could be stuck to the windows of existing equipment. The same would apply for temperature sensor arrays used in power distribution appliances (by gluing the sensing plastic foil directly on the equipment door). Object detection sensors could find their way in logistics.

All these new developments require the cooperation of new players from the printed electronics and conventional electronics industries. System-on-foil approaches call for new substrates (PET, PEN), new attach materials (low temperature conductive glue), new conductive materials (printable copper and silver inks, TCO Transparent Conductive Organic materials) as well as new assembly and inspection equipment (pick-and-place machines, visual inspection, oven).

EETimes Europe
July 2013

http://www.analog-eetimes.com/en/printed-electronics-opens-up-large-flexible-sensor-design-opportunities.html?cmp_id=71&news_id=222905399&vID=98









Click here to download the

[ PDF : 333 Ko ]
]]>
Tue, 16 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-285
<![CDATA[Flexible Image Sensors Printed on Plastic]]>
Flexible Image Sensors Printed on Plastic We've told you about Plastic Logic's prototype color flexible displays that can be cut with scissors and keep on working. We've also told you about the multi-display window flexible tablet PC prototype the company co-developed with Intel and Queen's University. UK-based Plastic Logic has now combined its expertise with French company ISORG to create what the pair tout as a first in flexible printed electronics: a large area, conformable, organic image sensor printed on plastic.

An image sensor, of course, is the heart of a camera. A camera's image quality, resolution, sensitivity to light, and ability to capture moving images without distortion are all dependent on its image sensor chip. So a flexible image sensor, especially one that can be printed on plastic, would be revolutionary.

The co-developed image sensor's resolution is only 94 pixels x 95 pixels, so the technology has a long way to go before it's used in smartphones. Pixel size is 175 microns with 200-micron spacing (375-micron pitch). But its active area is 4 cm x 4 cm (1.57 inch x 1.57 inch), not that far from a wristband or phone display size. The sensor combines ISORG's organic printed photodetectors (OPD) with the organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane developed by Plastic Logic, the basis of that company's previous technology breakthroughs. The two companies unveiled the first mechanical samples at the LOPE-C 2013 show in Munich on June 12 and June 13.

Flexible electronic circuits are not new. They're used in watches, cameras, cellphones, and several small and/or portable consumer devices, as well as automotive and aerospace applications. But the type of electronics that can be printed with these technologies has been limited. ISORG has developed large area organic electronics image sensors and organic photodetectors with printed electronics, which gives them low current consumption, as well as thin profiles, light weight, and a low cost-to-area ratio. ISORG has been working on implementing these optical sensors on plastic and glass substrates for several years. The company has focused on large spectrum response optic sensors in the visible and near infra-red spectra, with low power consumption. It has also created image sensors with large dynamic range and low noise at low light levels, a combination that's not easy to manage.

ISORG is a spinoff of the LITEN (Laboratory of Innovation for New Energy Technologies and Nanomaterials) research laboratory of the French government-funded CEA (Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission). Its image sensors are built by integrating rows and columns of photodiodes into a matrix. Depending on the application, a variety of pixel resolutions and matrix complexity can be built. Although ISORG has created several demonstrators and began a pilot production line in July 2012, it has not yet reached commercial volume production. That is expected at the end of next year, and will be a sheet-to-sheet manufacturing process that is compatible with ambient temperatures.

Meanwhile, Plastic Logic, a leader in plastic transistor R&D, has achieved volume production of its flexible, unbreakable, daylight-readable plastic displays, in both color and monochrome versions. A short video demonstrates a 12 fps color video animation on the company's flexible displays, which Plastic Logic says is a first, since refresh rates on this type of display are usually too slow for video.

For the co-developed flexible image sensor, Plastic Logic tweaked its backplane design, production process, and materials to fit the needs of ISORG's technology. The result is a backplane that is both transmissive and flexible. Aside from the more obvious applications that use digital image sensing, both companies expect the new sensor will be especially useful in medical, industrial, and security applications. Some of these are fingerprint scanning identification, interactive 3D user interfaces, and smart sensors for medical and diagnostic equipment. You can access short videos here and here that show ISORG's Magic Pad demonstrator, a touchless human-machine interface (HMI) based on a photodetector matrix that is capable of 3D gesture recognition at short distances.

Ann R. Thryft, Senior Technical Editor, Materials & Assembly

http://www.designnews.com

]]>
Fri, 12 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-282
<![CDATA[Flexible plastic camera sensor headed to smartphones, wearables and more]]>
Bendable cameras and sensors that can flex around corners could be on the horizon, with the first flexible image sensor built on plastic being developed by Plastic Logic and ISORG. The 40 x 40 mm sensor uses a flexible, transmissive backplane created by Plastic Logic, on top of which ISORG layers an organic photodetector material turning it into a resilient, lightweight camera module. It's not quite ready to replace the camera in your smartphone, however.

That's because, right now, the resolution captured is just 94 x 95 pixels. The pixels themselves are 175um in size, with 200um spacing; however, ISORG is confident that there are still plenty of applications for a large area image sensor.

Those could include roles in the medical, industrial, and security control industries, it's suggested. For instance, the flexible sensor could scan fingerprints for biometric security, be used for body-conformed wearable diagnostics and health sensors, or even as scanning surfaces, covering the full extent of a table, for instance, and mapping out whatever objects are placed on top.

For consumers, meanwhile, there's the possibility of new control interfaces, using the flexible image sensor as a moldable input surface for smartphones, tablets, or printers. For instance, a single panel of ISORG sensor material could be wrapped around the sides and back of a smartphone casing, and used to track taps and gestures with multiple fingertips across it.

Plastic Logic's technology began as a way to create entirely plastic-based ereader screens, with the company planning to take on the Kindle and other ebook platforms with its own "unbreakable" device. However, while the display technology worked, the ereader industry itself proved too cut-throat, and Plastic Logic segued into licensing out its plastic-transistor technology.

That's expected to show up in flexible color e-paper, low-cost tablet-style companion devices for smartphones, and wrist-conforming smartwatches. 

Chris Davies, Jun 13th 2013 

http://www.slashgear.com
http://www.slashgear.com/flexible-plastic-camera-sensor-headed-to-smartphones-wearables-and-more-13286295/

]]>
Fri, 12 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-283
<![CDATA[Printed electronics opens up large flexible sensor design opportunities.]]>
Printed electronics opens up large flexible sensor design opportunities Compared to traditional electronic solutions, printed electronics offers several differentiating factors which make them particularly well suited to sensing application. Most printing processes are compatible with large area substrates, which enable the design of large area sensors with sensing capabilities across surfaces of up to 500x500mm. This at a very competitive cost per area ratio (compared to amorphous silicon or CMOS technologies).

A pioneer in printed electronics applied to optical sensors, ISORG addresses several markets and functionalities. This includes scanning surfaces for X-ray
digital imaging with the co-integration of organic photodiodes with transistors on amorphous silicon, photodiodes combined with organic transistors on
plastic substrate.

In the future, substituting amorphous silicon technology with organic electronics will increase cost competitiveness and enable new products developments
(for lighter and more robust portable equipment). The first demonstrator of such a full organic image sensor is being fabricated as a collaborative development between Isorg and Plastic Logic. More particularly, the collaboration focuses on the deposition of organic printed photodetectors onto a plastic organic thin-film transistor backplane, to create a flexible sensor with a 40x40mm active area, 375um pitch (175um pixel size with 200um spacing) and a 94x95 = 8 930 pixel resolution.

Biometrics applications using fingerprint and palmar surface recognition could use printed electronics to substitute the typical CMOS-based sensors with thinner and lighter organic solutions. Current developments yield a pixel resolution of 50um. Such approaches could also enable the design of large scanning surfaces to substitute CCD line scanners in office equipment, yielding faster, lighter and thinner document scanners. 

Printed electronics also finds its way in temperature sensors in printed electronics, applying its large area sensing capabilities to the detection of hot spots, for example to monitor the power distribution and heat dissipation in power electronics
circuit boards.

Thin and flexible: a system-on-foil approach

Using PET as a substrate, it is now possible to design systemon-foil sensing solutions that combine optical sensors, discrete components such LED and flexible interconnections. In this way, contactless user interfaces can be built using organic
photodetectors, offering functionalities such as hand proximity detection and gesture recognition for power on/off or linear control (slider and vertical distance detection). These conformable system-on-foil user interfaces can even be integrated in smart
textiles products. The optical solution relies on the detection by organic photodetectors of the reflected infra-red light emitted by IR-LEDs directly mounted on a flex circuit, as shown in Figure 3. For this purpose, the organic semiconductor materials can
be tuned to operate both in visible and near infra-red bands. Being very thin and easy to glue to other substrates such as paper, these new sensors can easily turn plastic and paper into interactive surfaces for merchandising and smart packaging solutions or to detect nearby motion. Another use case for such optical sensors is to integrate NIR emitting LEDs and organic photodiodes at the periphery of a surface so that any object left on the surface can be spotted through the detection of light path occlusion - see Figure 4. Such applications are under development for industrial products and multi-touch user interfaces and displays.


Retrofit sensors

Because flexible and printed electronics foil sensors are easy to glue, they can easily be fitted to existing equipment. For example, Isorg is investigating the use of optical sensors for spatial spectroscopy as an in-line process control for the pharmaceutical
industry. These sensors could be stuck to the windows of existing equipment. The same would apply for temperature sensor arrays used in power distribution appliances (by gluing the sensing plastic foil directly on the equipment door). Object detection sensors could find their way in logistics.

All these new developments require the cooperation of new players from the printed electronics and conventional electronics industries. System-on-foil approaches call for new substrates (PET, PEN), new attach materials (low temperature conductive glue), new conductive materials (printable copper and silver inks, TCO Transparent Conductive Organic materials) as well as new assembly and inspection equipment (pick-and-place machines, visual inspection, oven).

EETimes Europe
July 2013

http://www.analog-eetimes.com/en/printed-electronics-opens-up-large-flexible-sensor-design-opportunities.html?cmp_id=71&news_id=222905399&vID=98








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Fri, 12 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-284
<![CDATA[Surfaces to gain digital sensing]]>
Surfaces to gain digital sensing French plastic electronics developer Isorg is working with the UK's Plastic Logic to bring to market game-changing technology that embeds digital image sensing into a variety of products and surfaces, including portable electronics.
The collaboration, announced at this year's LOPE-C show in Munich, combines Isorg's organic large area image sensors printed on plastic with Plastic Logic's organic thin film transistor (OTFT) arrays to produce a flexible, robust high resolution image sensor. First mechanical samples were made available at LOPE-C.

When Plastic Logic began refocusing its energies on developing, with partners, new applications for flexible displays using its OTFT backplane technology Isorg was one of the companies it wanted to work with. Combining its organic photodetectors with TFTs opens up new applications for Isorg's technology, like digital image scanning.
Isorg co-founder Laurent Jamet elaborates: 'At the moment smart phones and tablets can be used to take pictures of documents with good results, but you could have a tablet or e-reader with a scanning surface that is easier to use and can scan documents or other objects in much higher resolution.'

Future plans
While Jamet agrees that the Plastic Logic partnership opens new doors for the company's technology, Isorg is making rapid progress in bringing its core technology to market since it was initially founded in 2010 as a spin-off of French R&D organisation CEA LITEN. In the coming months the company will begin shipping the first samples from its pilot line, installed at its headquarters in Grenoble in 2012, one of which is for an object recognition application for an industrial customer.

The company is expanding on several fronts. A mass production line is being installed in a new site in Grenoble in the spring of 2014 to be operational by the end of next year, while there are plans in the pipeline to open global offices in Hong Kong and in the US and increase staff hires. The mass production line will be able to produce plastic sensor foils up to 50 cm sq in size, what Jamet calls its third generation technology, in comparison to its first gen foils that are 32 by 38 cm in size.

For Plastic Logic, which had to optimize backplane design, production process and materials to create a flexible, transmissive backplane suitable for Isorg's requirements, the partnership represents a significant opportunity for the UK firm to move its unique flexible transistor technology beyond plastic displays.


Sara Ver-Bruggen - 05 July 2013

Plusplasticelectronics.com

http://www.plusplasticelectronics.com/consumerelectronics/surfaces-to-gain-digital-sensing-85003.aspx





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Fri, 12 Jul 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-281
<![CDATA[ISORG and Plastic Logic co-develop the world's first image sensor on plastic]]>
ISORG and Plastic Logic co-develop the world's first image sensor on plastic ISORG and Plastic Logic
have co-developed the first conformable
organic image sensor on plastic, with
the potential to revolutionise
weight/power trade-offs and optical
design parameters for any systems with a
digital imaging element.


First mechanical samples will be publicly
unveiled at LOPE-C 2013 (ISORG / CEA
booth B0-509) from 12 to 13 June in
Munich, Germany.

The collaboration is based on the
deposition of organic printed
photodetectors (OPD), pioneered by
ISORG, onto a plastic organic thin-film
transistor (OTFT) backplane, developed
by the technology leader, Plastic Logic,
to create a flexible sensor with a 4x4
cm active area, 375um pitch (175um pixel
size with 200um spacing) and 94 x 95 = 8
930 pixel resolution.

The backplane design, production process
and materials were optimised for the
application by Plastic Logic to meet
ISORG's requirements. The result, a
flexible, transmissive backplane,
represents a significant breakthrough in
the manufacture of new large area image
sensors and demonstrates the potential
use of Plastic Logic's unique flexible
transistor technology to also move
beyond plastic displays. Combined with
ISORG's unique organic photodetector
technology, it opens up the
possibilities for a range of new
applications, based around digital image
sensing, including smart packaging and
sensors for medical equipment and
biomedical diagnostics, security and
mobile commerce (user identification by
fingerprint scanning), environmental,
industrial, scanning surfaces and 3D
interactive user interfaces for consumer
electronics (printers, smartphones,
tablets, etc.).

ISORG's CEO, Jean-Yves Gomez stated: "We
are extremely pleased to showcase our
disruptive photodiode technology in a
concrete application for imaging
sensing. The ability to create conformal
and large area image sensors, which are
also thinner, lighter and more robust
and portable than current equipment is
of increasing importance, especially in
the medical, industrial and security
control sectors."

Indro Mukerjee, CEO Plastic Logic said:
"I am delighted that Plastic Logic can
now demonstrate the far-reaching
potential of the underlying technology.
Our ability to create flexible,
transmissive backplanes has led us not
only to co-develop a flexible image
sensor, but is also key to flexible OLED
displays as well as unbreakable LCDs."

About ISORG

ISORG is the leading and pioneer company
in organic photodetectors and large area
image sensors in printed electronics.
ISORG develops a disruptive technology
transforming plastic and glass into
smart surfaces able to see. These new
sensors are conformable, thin and
lightweight with low current
consumption, offering unique advantages
over traditional image sensors in terms
of sensing area, cost per area ratio and
mechanical integration. These sensors
enable creation of many innovative
products such interactive surfaces for
object detection and recognition, large
area scanning surfaces, revolutionary
user interfaces for consumer products.
ISORG technology opens innovation for
medical, industry and consumer markets.

ISORG has industrialized the process
with its pilot manufacturing line in
Grenoble and plans mass production
volumes for end 2014 with its
manufacturing unit in Grenoble
area.

Companies interested in working together
with ISORG should contact
contact@isorg.fr.

Media Contact at ISORG

Laurent Jamet
Co-founder, Head of Business Development
Tel.: +33 6 09 45 73 70
Email: laurent.jamet@isorg.fr

About Plastic Logic

Plastic Logic is the recognised leader
in organic thin-film transistors and has
been at the forefront of research and
investment into plastic electronics
since the company was founded by
researchers from the Cavendish
Laboratory at Cambridge University. The
company has industrialised the process
and now manufactures high-quality
flexible plastic displays (colour and
monochrome) of various sizes. These
unbreakable daylight readable displays
are conformal, thin and lightweight with
low battery consumption, offering huge
advantages over conventional screens as
they are extremely flexible with proven
lifetimes of over five years and more
than 10 million page updates. Flexible,
bendable displays enable revolutionary
design possibilities and are set to
transform existing markets, such as
signage, wristwatches and wearable
devices, automotive as well as many
others. Plastic Logic is backed by major
investors including Oak Investment
Partners and Rusnano.

Find out more about Plastic Logic and
its robust, flexible displays by
visiting

http://www.plasticlogic.com
and  http://www.youtube.com/plasticlogic.

Companies interested in working together
with Plastic Logic should contact
info@plasticlogic.com.

Media Contact at Plastic Logic:

Ian Reid
Marketing Director
Tel.: +44 1223 707 377
Email: ian.reid@plasticlogic.com



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Tue, 11 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-279
<![CDATA[Interactive surfaces for smart packaging, optical sensors create the magic]]>
Interactive surfaces for smart packaging, optical sensors create the magic










Imagine a bottle or package able to detect proximity or
position of your hand and start to illuminate. Imagine a P.O.S
(Point-Of-Sales) display able to see people moving around
and attract you, starting to sing. Imagine a surface able to
detect when you take the perfume box and emitting the
perfume fragrance. All these funny functionalities are now
possible thanks to the latest developments of optical sensors
in printed electronics, combined with other technologies such
as electroluminescent panel, LED or printed loudspeaker.
These sensors are based on organic photodetectors able
to measure and sense the light, detect objects over the
surface, detect motion of people or position of hands to
control light and sound effects. Using thin and light plastic
substrates, they are very easily integrated on paper or plastic
surfaces and in packaging elements by lamination.
Printed electronics is a sales booster to engage people, influence
purchase and build brand. It creates magic, fun and buzz.
This technology enables new interaction with consumers
for eye catcher POS displays in supermarkets for creation
of new marketing tools for consumer goods industry, or in
selective distribution shops for perfume and cosmetics.
These sensors can be integrated in bottle packaging to
create high value products for limited series of spirits for
brand recognition : imagine a champagne bottle package
transformed into interactive loudspeaker able to change
track or increase volume by approaching your hand.
These sensors can be also integrated into posters to control
multimedia animations on remote TV display, launching
videos, navigating on presentation or photos album : many
applications are considered for professional exhibitions,
museums, corporate halls. Think about new posters for
teenagers to control music of remote smart phone music dock
station by moving your hand over the poster, up and down
to control the volume, right and left to move to next track.
New product creation is now possible for gaming and book
industry : imagine a paper or plastic surface transformed
into a virtual ping-pong table able to detect motion of hands
over the surface and illuminate virtual ball position. Imagine a
paper surface transformed into a virtual DJ table able to detect
rotation of hand. Imagine a book able to recognize physical
objects such as letters or numbers for kid education.
This technology enables also new merchandizing functionalities
transforming surfaces of shops into interactive surfaces able to
detect presence of box for anti-theft or new customer interaction
(starting light or sound animation when taking the box)

Some of these new concepts became reality with ISORG. ISORG
is a new company based in Grenoble (France) developing and
manufacturing optical sensors on plastic in printed electronics.
ISORG has developed very unique expertise for integration of
their sensors to the packaging, graphics and communication
industry by offering complete engineering services for prototype
and product creation : sensor design and manufacturing,
electronics system design, light-sound-display technologies
integration (with partners), product design (with partner design
house). Videos of these exciting developments in smart packaging
are available on www.youtube.com (keyword: isorg)

OPE (Organic & Printed Electronics) Journal, May 2013
www.ope-journal.com



Click here to download the

[ PDF : 1682 Ko ]
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Thu, 06 Jun 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-277
<![CDATA[ISORG receives the JPCA Award]]>
ISORG receives the JPCA Award ISORG, the pioneer company of organic photodetectors and image sensors, today announced that it has been selected for the JPCA Award for New Product Introduction.

The "JPCA Award" was founded in 2005 as an award system to the products as well as technologies to contribute to the advancement of electronic-circuit technologies and industry.

The 9th JPCA Show Award Winners are selected among NPI presentation participants by JPCA Show Award Selection Committee, which consists of Academic expert and Electronic Circuits Industry Specialists.

The JPCA exhibition is a major electronics exhibition in Japan with more than 40 000 visitors per day.

ISORG technology will be presented by Techno-Alpha at the JPCA exhibition in Tokyo on 5th to 7th June : Tokyo Big Sight, JAPAN, East Hall 4, Booth%uFF1A4E-17 (15th Jisso Process Technology Exhibition)

Techno Alpha is distributing partner of ISORG in Japan.

http://www.jpcashow.com/show2013/en/event/jpca_award.php
http://www.technoalpha.co.jp/english/exhibition

ISORG is the pioneer company of organic photodetectors and image sensors.

"We give vision to all surfaces" : ISORG is the leading company in organic and printed electronics optical sensors with his disruptive technology transforming plastic and glass surfaces into surfaces able to see. ISORG technology enables many new applications and functionalities: a revolutionary user interface with 3D gesture recognition (the ’post-tactile' technology), large area digital imaging and scanning, interactive surfaces with motion and object detection.

ISORG addresses various markets : medical digital imaging and life sciences, industry, smart packaging and consumer electronics.

www.isorg.fr

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Thu, 30 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-273
<![CDATA[ISORG Moves Closer to Commercialization]]>
ISORG Moves Closer to Commercialization There are quite a number of printed electronics manufacturers who have made the leap from the lab to pilot production. The next step is to bring their product into commercialization, which takes a great deal of effort, both in terms of finding the right markets and upsizing their company.


ISORG is successfully navigating the path to commercialization. Founded in May 2010, ISORG, or Image Sensor Organic, in partnership with CEA-LITEN, the French Laboratory of Innovation for New Energy Technologies and Nanomaterials, introduced the Magic Pad in 2011.

The Magic Pad a flexible organic photo-detector array demonstrator that can transform glass and plastic into smart surfaces. Potential applications include consumer electronics, interactive packaging, home appliances, industrial displays and games. By mid-2011, ISORG had caught the eye of designers, and was developing its own manufacturing line on Grenoble, France.

Now, two years later, Laurent Jamet, business development and co-founder of ISORG, said the company has continued to grow worldwide while further developing its sensor technology.

"We now have 18 people in our company, with a team in Hong Kong for international business development," Jamet said. "We have a team dedicated to product development able to develop all the opto-electronics systems to offer whole solutions to our customers: sensor design and production and complete system development (sensor, readout electronics and signal processing) and integration (system-in-foil).

"We started industrial transfer in July 2012 with our pilot manufacturing line located in Grenoble," Jamet added. "This line is a 500m2 clean room with a complete set of printing equipment (screen printing, gravure printing, slot die coating). Our manufacturing process (fully printed) will be qualified for mass production by the end of this year."

Jamet added that ISORG is currently building its mass production facilities as well.

"We have launched building and installation for our mass production unit, also located in Grenoble, in different facilities than the existing pilot line," Jamet said. "We plan mass production in volumes by the end of 2014, beginning of 2015. We have been starting international fund raising activity and are currently in discussions with several investors."

ISORG has further refined its sensor technology to meet the needs of customers. Last year, in conjunction with a customer, the company developed an image sensor prototype at a resolution of 150um by combining its organic photodetector technology with a silicon transistor array. Jamet added that developments are on going for a combination of ISORG's organic photodetectors with an organic transistor matrix array (full plastic image sensor).

These image sensors can be used in numerous applications.


"Printed photodetectors and image sensors are offering new functionalities or benefits to a large number of markets," Jamet said. "Large area sensing offers a very competitive area-cost ratio, mechanical integration (thin, light, conformable), fast and inexpensive custom design and proprietary customer solution. Our sensors enable various functionalities such as large scanning, large area object detection, interactive surfaces for proximity and contactless hand detection."

These markets include the medical x-ray imaging industry, smart packaging, smart textiles, smart pill dispenser at pharmacies, diagnostics and home appliances.

With its technology in place, Jamet said that ISORG is working closely with companies in a wide range of fields to integrate its sensor technology.

"We have met leading international companies that came to us to develop innovative products and functionalities," Jamet said. "We have been starting several collaborations, prototype proof-of-concept and product prototype developments for major companies, and we have identified short term business opportunities for the industrial segment with leading customers. We have also identified longer term opportunities for integration of our technology in displays, such as laptops and tablets, and have been contacted by major OEM companies in the consumer electronics market.

"A disruptive innovation is to propose an 'all-in-one' technology for a user interface based on optical sensors for seamless tactile-like navigation and 3D gesture recognition, a scanning surface for document scanning and user identification," Jamet added. "We have also identified opportunity for integration of our technology in CMOS cameras, replacing silicon photodiodes by organic photodiodes to offer improved performances (low noise, high dynamic range, operation in visible and near infrared). We plan to offer a licence business model to the display and CMOS sensor industries to transfer our technology in to their manufacturing sites. We have also started development of a new generation of sensors: printed temperature sensors for industrial markets."

By David Savastano

Printed Electronics Now

http://www.printedelectronicsnow.com/articles/2013/05/isorg-moves-closer-to-commercialization


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Thu, 16 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-272
<![CDATA[ISORG named to GARTNER's Cool Vendor list 2013 in Imaging and Display Devices]]>
ISORG, the pioneer company of organic photodetectors and image sensors, today announced that it has been named in the GARTNER's Cool Vendor list 2013 in Imaging and Display Devices.
The Cool Vendors Report identifies companies that have the potential to become important in the next generation products. Gartner has selected innovative vendors of interest to OEMs, system integrators whose products involve imaging or displays, applicable to a wide range of devices including smart phones, tablets and TVs.
ISORG was recognized as innovative company. ISORG is able to transform glass and plastic surfaces into smart surfaces capable of vision, that enable cost effective and intelligent displays for home appliances, consumer electronics and industrial displays.
About ISORG : ISORG is the pioneer company of organic photodetectors and image sensors.
"We give vision to all surfaces" : ISORG is the leading company in organic and printed electronics optical sensors with his disruptive technology transforming plastic and glass surfaces into surfaces able to see. ISORG technology enables many new applications and functionalities: a revolutionary user interface with 3D gesture recognition (the ’post-tactile' technology), large area digital imaging and scanning, interactive surfaces with motion and object detection.
ISORG addresses various markets : medical digital imaging and life sciences, industry, smart packaging and consumer electronics.
www.isorg.fr
Cool Vendors in Imaging and Display Devices 2013, published 2 May 2013
Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner's research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

Analysts : Ganesh Ramampprthy
http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/cool-vendors/



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Tue, 14 May 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-271
<![CDATA[ISORG in Semiconductor Times]]>
ISORG in Semiconductor Times




ISORG (Image Sensor ORGanic) was
spun out of CEA LITEN (Grenoble,
France) in May 2010 to develop and industrialize
organic photodetectors and
image sensors. ISORG is focused on
technology for converting glass and plastic
surfaces into smart surfaces able to
capture information and react to it.
ISORG's mission is "to develop and produce
in high volume large area optical
sensors for a wide range of markets."
Large area organic photodetectors will
be developed by strip integration of unit
photodiodes. Large area organic image
sensors will be developed using a matrix
integration of rows and columns of unit
photodiodes. Different pixel resolutions
and matrix complexity will be addressed,
depending on the application and market.
The technology is based on new
organic-conductor and semiconductor
materials combined with large area, highvolume
deposition and patterning
equipment.
ISORG is using organic materials that
are solution processable and are deposited
at ambient temperature in different
ways such as screen printing, spray coating,
extrusion coating and inkjet printing.
No vacuum-air processing is required.
Plastic substrates will enable the design
of flexible and conformable 3D sensors
in any form factor. The sensors will be
transparent, ultra thin, and lightweight.
The photodetectors will have a large -
and possibly selective - spectral
response, ranging from visible (400nm
- 700nm) up to Near Infra Red (NIR,
700nm - 1100nm) and higher.
ISORG has a strategic R&D partnership
with the CEA-LITEN, one of the most
important research centers in Europe for
New Energy Technologies and Nanomaterials,
illustrated by more than 50
man-years activity and 25 patents. The
company is also part of several committees
working in Organic Electronics,
Optical, Photonic and Electronics
sectors.
ISORG intends to develop a range of
products in low, medium or high resolution
on both plastic and glass substrate
for various applications and markets size.
Examples include a large area, low resolution
photodetector strip or matrix for
industrial, environment, smart building,
home appliances and toys markets; large
area, medium resolution image sensors
for industrial and consumer electronics
markets; and large area, high resolution
image sensors for medical market.
The first functional prototypes are already
available and an R&D pilot line is under
construction at Grenoble. Development
for the first customer has also started.
Jean-Yves Gomez, co-founder & CEO
(previously CEO of Vi Technology, and
held numerous VP-level positions at
ST Microelectronics)
Emmanuel Guérineau, co-founder &
Finance & Programs Director
(previously HR & Financial Director
at VIT Group
Laurent Jamet, co-founder (previously
held engineering and business roles at
ST, Business Development Director
for Smart Textiles at SOFILETA and
joined CEA LITEN in 2010 as project
holder for ISORG)

http://www.pinestream.com/semiconductortimes.htm

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Fri, 26 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-270
<![CDATA[ISORG at Printed Electronics Europe 2013]]>
Track 3  featured some leading Printed Electronics innovators discussing Sensor Technology Developments.
Laurent Jamet, ISORG's co-founder and director business development, led off with "When Printed Electronics Meet Design and Usages for Highly Innovative Functionalities."

ISORG's organic photosensors transform plastic, paper and glass into smart and interactive surfaces.

"Our fully integrated organic photosensors are a fully printed process that is air and temperature ambient and is produced sheet to sheet," James said. "These are thin, light robust and flexible sensors. We create a large area optical sensor with no need for optical elements, and have also developed gesture recognition at a short distance."

Jamet noted that ISORG is reaching commercialization now.

"Our pilot production line began in 2012," James said. "We are transferring the technology to the market now, with mass production starting next year. Target applications include medical and health, such as sensors for digital x-ray imaging, pharmacy and diagnostics; industrial; and consumer markets, which includes smart phones and tablets, appliances, image sensors, smart textiles and smart packaging."

David Savastano

"PE Europe 2013 Attendees Learn About Opportunities for Printed Electronics"

Printed Electronics Now

http://www.printedelectronicsnow.com/articles/2013/04/peeurope-2013-attendees-learn-about-opportunities-


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Wed, 24 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-269
<![CDATA[Magic Pad, a new web site for the 'post-tactile' user interface]]>
Magic Pad, a new web site for the 'post-tactile' user interface

The Magic Pad is an astonishing device, a 3D interactive multimedia tablet with optical gesture recognition.
The Magic Pad demonstrates the impressive 'post-tactile' user interface technology developed by ISORG for industrial and consumer electronics markets.

ISORG technology enables mutlimedia navigation without contact and creates a real 3D immersive user interface for incredible interaction with graphics.

ISORG technology offers to the market the new interface replacing traditional tactile and touch screen interface and fast and accurate hand gesture recognition.

ISORG technology will offer also possibility to transform display into a scanning surface to create new functionalities : scan of handwritten notes, articles, drawings,...

More details on the new web site : www.magicpad.fr



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Sun, 20 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-265
<![CDATA[ISORG in Korea IT Times (Industry & Technology)]]>
ISORG in Korea IT Times (Industry & Technology) Highlights from Second Day at Printed Electronics USA 2012

SANTA CLARA, USA - The second and final day of Printed Electronics USA in Santa Clara really illustrated how far the technologies had progressed and the huge variety of players in the field. The event, organized by IDTechEx, was the best and biggest edition of the series so far. Amongst the attendees were company founders, directors, engineers, academics, but also students and patent attorneys. In particular, there were a large number of end users attending the show.



Multi-Track

The three parallel tracks covered a wide range of applications, such as sensors, displays and memory, but also materials like conductive inks and barrier films. An additional track was dedicated to manufacturing and Graphene LIVE! was also running at the same time.

On the tradeshow floor, some brands were already well known, like PolyIC, Thinfilm, Xaar or DuPont.
Others were new to the show. Take ISORG for example. For this French startup company, it was the first time at Printed Electronics USA. This was a good opportunity to see demos of their printed photo-detector arrays in action. IDTechEx also had a booth and many attendees walked in to seek some advice from the team of analysts.

The Printed Electronics series of events will be moving next to Berlin, Germany, included in the event will be Printed Electronics Europe 2013 and Graphene LIVE! Europe 2013. For the first time, it will also be co-located with Energy Harvesting and Storage Europe 2013 and Wireless Sensor Networks 2013. Analysts IDTechEx see the co-location of all these topics as a great benefit to attendees - not only will the networking opportunities be vast, but the overlap between topics is becoming more evident as the industries progress.

Korea IT Times
10th December 2012
http://www.koreaittimes.com/story/24846/highlights-second-day-printed-electronics-usa-2012





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Wed, 09 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-262
<![CDATA[Printed Opto-Detectors (Media & Entertainment Technology)]]>
Printed Electronics USA, Santa Clara, CA%u2014 Laurent Jamet from ISORG presented the results of their efforts to print near-IR opto-detectors on various substrates. The capability to place optical detectors on a substrate allows new modes of sensing and interactivity in many applications.

Photodetectors with near linear response and low dark current are possible with printable materials. An active matrix of detectors can resolve at resolutions down to 50 microns, and can scale to larger image sizes. The sensor arrays are placed in a 32 x 38cm area in a sheet-to-sheet process. The process can use either glass or plastic substrates.

For large area sensing, the image resolution can be increased up to 1cm and the functions can be set for larger object detection. The resulting flexible electronics can be placed on non-planar surfaces. This flexible circuitry needs mechanical integration to achieve thin, light, and customizable optical sensing.

Some specialized applications include 3-D detection over a 0-50cm range, large area detection, and non-optical sensing. Interactive surfaces in various configurations are possible. Some functions include point of sales terminals, interactive posters, smart phones, and man-machine interfaces. Other areas like toys, educational environments, automotive, and consumer electronics can all use this technology, as well as some versions of smart packaging.

Potentially, this material can be used to replace a computer mouse, but the resolution will call for a sensor that is over 6-inches in diameter. The detectors can be coupled with IR emitters to from an active sensor that can detect gross and medium coarseness motions. One version of the sensor array can detect motions of a whole hand, or individual fingers, but could not detect a single finger motion

December 6, 2012
Media & Entertainment Technology
http://mandetech.com/2012/12/20/printed-opto-detectors/


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Wed, 09 Jan 2013 00:00:00 GMT 48-263
<![CDATA[ISORG in Plastic Electronics magazine with MINALOGIC interactive poster]]>
ISORG in Plastic Electronics magazine with MINALOGIC interactive poster Plastic Electronics magazine gives report of the Plastic Electronics conference in Dresden (9-11 October) and illustrates latest developments with ISORG developments for the Micro and Nanotechnology centre Minalogic
an animated and illuminated poster produced by Isorg was exposed on MINALOGIC stand, for navigation on multimedia content by moving hand over the surface (without contact).

http://www.plusplasticelectronics.com/home.aspx


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Mon, 26 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMT 48-257
<![CDATA[Isorg demonstrates interactive surface at Plastic Electronics 2012 : VIDEO]]>
Isorg demonstrates interactive surface at Plastic Electronics 2012 : VIDEO ISORG, a start-up established to commercialise sensors based on organic electronics in France, has demonstrated its interactive surface technology at Plastic Electronics 2012.

The company displayed an interactive poster for Minalogic, a competitive cluster grouping R&D organisations to support networking and development of innovative technologies. The group was keen to work with Isorg to use the demonstrator, to show what organic electronic technology could provide.

The demonstrator attracted plenty of attention at the event, and the technology is already being recognised and taken seriously. Isorg is currently in talks with a major food manufacturer about using the technology in packaging.

Potential
Laurent Jamet, co-founder of Isorg, comments: 'The demonstrator at Plastic Electronics 2012 shows the possible benefits of the technology, illustrating how it allows surfaces to work with the user, and triggering attention to what organic sensors can do.'

As well as the potential in the food packaging industry, Jamet also believes the technology will work with other markets: 'Interactive surfaces can be used as a point of view display for supermarkets, for displays in museums, packaging in the spirits and cosmetics markets, and more. They can allow users to bring up information, watch videos and more.'

Minalogic will use the demonstrator at various events around the world to highlight both its aims of grouping research to bring technologies to market, and Isorg's innovations with organic electronics.

Phil Curry - 01 November 2012

http://www.plusplasticelectronics.com/consumerelectronics/isorg-demonstrates-interative-surface-at-plastic-electronics-2012-video-67887.aspx

video on Youtube :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ScuzrZP-xk


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Mon, 05 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMT 48-253